South Africa's silent revolution

Posted 16 August 2013

A silent revolution is taking place. When the regulatory over-burden becomes intolerable, people ignore those laws that inhibit their survival. The battle over e-tolling is an example of the silent revolution in action, and this is a battle government must win if it is to reclaim lost legitimacy, writes Ciaran Ryan

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Lawyers set up companies to tackle cases on risk

Posted 14 August 2013

The jury is out on whether it is ethically appropriate for lawyers to set up companies to take legal cases on risk and share in the spoils, as happened when Pretoria attorney Chris Schoeman and two partners took on a case for former Vodacom employee Nkosana Makate, who is claiming he came up with the "Please Call Me" idea that was adopted by Vodacom but never got paid for it.  

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The markets have spoken: Zim stock market down a quarter after election

Posted 12 August 2013

Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe may end up being hoist by his own petard as evidence of electoral fraud continues to pour in, writes Eddie Cross from Bulawayo. This leaves the South Africa government in a pickle, as it has already blessed what appears to be a fraudulent result.

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South Africa: Legalised Plunder and the Land of Wrongs

Posted 08 August 2013

Attorney SA Watson, an associate of the Ludwig Von Mises Institute SA, thinks South Africa is on a dangerous path. The Constitution, far from protecting us, turns “rights” into obligations and uses emotions and race to re-engineer society. 

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Zuma is damaged by rushing to endorse Zimbabwe election

Posted 07 August 2013

SA must guard against the Zanufication of SA politics, writes Mamphela Ramphele. President Zuma's rush to endorse the disputed election in Zimbabwe, which saw Robert Mugabe's Zanu PF claim 61% of the vote, is a worrying sign of the general disregard for constitutional democracy that has taken root at home.

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How the Zimbabwe election was stolen: mass civil disobedience planned

Posted 03 August 2013

MDC representative Eddie Cross explains how the Zimbabwe election was stolen by Robert Mugabe's Zanu PF: by rigging the voters roll. Mass civil disobedience seems certain. The only question is whether MDC leaders will be able to contain the threats of armed insurgency that are surfacing in Zimbabwe.

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Bankers face 10 years prison in Germany

Posted 01 August 2013

The entire executive board of HSH Nordbank in Germany face up to 10 years in prison if found guilty of breaching trust. This is one of several trials involving bankers in Europe, and reflects mounting fury over the conduct of banks leading up to the financial crisis in 2008.

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South Africans have a poor view of the court system

Posted 31 July 2013

Research by the HSRC suggests most South Africans have a poor view of the court system, and many question the impartiality of court decisions, according to an editorial in Business Day.

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In a truly free election, the MDC will destroy Zimbabwe's Zanu PF

Posted 28 July 2013

Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) representative Eddie Cross writes that Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe and his Zanu-PF Party, which has been in power for more than 30 years, is headed for electoral defeat. This time, they will find it more difficult to rig the outcome.

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Journalists' right to protect sources upheld

Posted 28 July 2013

The Constitutional Court has upheld an important principle of press freedom - the right to protect confidential sources. This, after a case of defamation was brought against Mail & Guardian by Bosasa Operation back in 2009.

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The case for segregating boys and girls

Posted 23 July 2013

Modern schools emphasise victim propaganda, docility and acceptable behaviour, writes Fred Reed. The problem of "low academic standards" reportedly achieved by boys can be solved in 10 minutes: segregate boys and girls. 

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Third lottery licence goes to one lucky winner

Posted 23 July 2013

A third lottery licence is on the table and it exposes in fine-grained detail how the government outlaws efficiency, innovation and competition, while encouraging stagnation, inefficiency and cronyism, writes Ivo Vegter in The Daily Maverick.

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Black empowerment bill fails Constitutional muster, says FW De Klerk Foundation

Posted 23 July 2013

The Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act and the Amendment Bill fail Constitutional muster and should be scrapped in their entirety, according to a report by the FW De Klerk Foundation for Constitutional Rights.

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ANC and DA line up behind semi-socialist National Development Plan

Posted 22 July 2013

The National Development Plan talks loftily of achieving growth of 5,4% a year, and 11 million jobs by 2030, but is in reality a recipe for state intervention on a scale not previously imagined.

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More anti-corruption units won't help

Posted 21 July 2013

South Africa has more than a dozen anti-corruption units, yet still it scores well below our main trading partners in the Transparency International anti-corruption index. There are better ways to tackle this thorny issue, writes Paul Hoffman SC of the Institute of Accountability in Southern Africa.

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Shuttleworth loses court bid but scores points with judge

Posted 19 July 2013

Billionaire Mark Shuttleworth lost in his court bid to overturn exchange controls, but he did pave the way for future challenges against clauses the judge deemed unconstitutional.

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National Development Plan doomed without major reform

Posted 18 July 2013

The government's National Development Plan is doomed to fail because it relies on the same, tired state interventions that have failed in the past, and does not address the urgent need for policy reform, according to the SA Institute of Race Relations.

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Bill tabled to curb officials’ state business deals

Posted 17 July 2013

A DRAFT bill has been tabled in Parliament which aims to prohibit state employees and their families from directly or indirectly holding more than a 5% interest in any entity that does business with the government unless prior approval is obtained from the relevant minister.

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Government is a menace to the mining industry

Posted 09 July 2013

Reckless and arbitrary actions by government ministers have done as much damage to the mining industry as anything else, says John Kane-Berman of the SA Institute of Race Relations.

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The surveillance state is fighting for its life

Posted 06 July 2013

Revelations by whistleblower Edward Snowden of the National Security Agency's mass snooping of phone calls and emails may be the start of a worldwide roll-back of state incursions into our civil liberties. SA will not be exempted, writes Ciaran Ryan. 

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Insolvencies are down: a good or bad sign?

Posted 03 July 2013

Insolvencies are down, but the country faces a debt epidemic unparalleled in its history, writes Arlene Levy. It's time the banks were held to account in the courts. 

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Fais is a flop and should be scrapped

Posted 03 July 2013

Few of the benefits promised when the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services (Fais) Act was introduced more than a decade ago have come to pass. It should be scrapped, writes Leon Louw of the Free Market Foundation. 

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SA government spying worse than US

Posted 30 June 2013

For all the outrage over the US surveillance programme leaked by whistleblower Ed Snowden, South Africans will be shocked to learn that our own government is miles ahead of the US in terms of snooping. 

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The rule of law is senior to the Bill of Rights

Posted 26 June 2013

The rule of law is senior to the Constitution's Bill of Rights, says Free Market Foundation's Leon Louw, and is the pillar on which civilisation rests.

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Who will protect us from the spies?

Posted 26 June 2013

South Africa's Secrecy Bill is all about protecting our own spy agencies from scrutiny, says Steven Friedman. Recent revelations by former CIA spy Edward Snowden of massive surveillance programmes being carried out by the US and Britain has triggered a timely debate over how much privacy should we be handing over to these agencies.

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