Jordan Peterson - pilloried for speaking common sense

Posted 12 February 2018

Jordan Peterson, a professor of psychology at Toronto University, has become something of a rock star for his evangelical approach to common sense. He first gained notoriety when he refused to abide by the University's edict that transgender people should be addressed by pronouns of their choosing, such as ‘zhe’ and ‘zher’ rather than ‘he’ or ‘she’. He went on Channel 4 to debate the issue and delivered a master class in common sense, rendering the combative interviewer speechless at one point. It's worth saving for posterity, if only to show how crazy these cultural wars have become. The Left needs to wake up to some of the nonsense being propagated in their name.

Read More »



Believe it or not: Zim was once the freest economy in the world

Posted 10 February 2018

Zim was once the freest economy in the world, says Zimbabwean parliamentarian Eddie Cross. It happenbed between 2009 and 2013 when an opposition MP took over the finance ministry and lifted exchange controls and scrapped price controls that had been implemented by the previous government. All manner of economic restrictions were lifted, resulting in an economic flowering the likes of which had not been seen before or since. This all came to an end in 2013 when Zanu-PF regained absolute control of the government. But there is a lesson here for all Africa countries. If we in SA follow the Zimbabwean model (indeed, should Zim follow its own example), a new era of economic prosperity would eventuate.

Read More »



Mining charters are unconstitutional and must be scrapped - lawyer

Posted 09 February 2018

Mining lawyer Hulme Scholes has brought an application before the Johannesburg High Court to have all three versions of the Mining Charter set aside on the grounds that they are unconstitutional. The government needs to replace the charters with law which will remove political interference from the policy process.

Read More »



How Bank of Baroda's misadventures dragged it into SA's political crisis

Posted 07 February 2018

A scandal involving Bank of Baroda’s South Africa operations, a cabal of businessmen of Indian origin, and South African President Jacob Zuma, has undermined the reputation of India’s second largest bank and resulted in an unprecedented penalty by the South African Reserve Bank.

Read More »



Zuma reaches his Rubicon

Posted 04 February 2018

President Jacob Zuma could trigger a Constitutional crisis this week should he proceed with his plans to deliver the state of the nation (Sona) address to parliament. Opposition parties are united in their call for a postponement of Sona, while prosecutors and police prepare for a trial which may see Zuma face 783 charges of fraud, money laundering and racketeering.

Read More »



Michael Komape died because he was a rural African child

Posted 02 February 2018

Michael Komape drowned in a pit toilet outside Polokwane in 2014. Such a death could only occur to a rural African child in a school where neglect and indifference were standard. The family is suing the province's Department of Basic Education, seeking more than R2m in damages and a court order that will force the government to attend to the shocking state of sanitation in schools across the province.

Read More »



Prison inmates go 20 hours between meals

Posted 30 January 2018

Fourteen inmates of Johannesburg “Sun City” Medium B prison yesterday told the High Court that they were going up to 20 hours between the last meal of the day and breakfast. Fourteen inmates of Johannesburg “Sun City” Medium B prison yesterday told the High Court that they were going up to 20 hours between the last meal of the day and breakfast. The case cast an interesting light on conditions in the prison, with allegations that prison guards are dealing in drugs. 

Read More »



Capitec Bank is the latest target of the sleuths at Viceroy Research

Posted 30 January 2018

Viceroy Research, which last year highlighted accounting irregularities at Steinhoff and brought it to its knees, has this time shone a light on Capitec Bank, calling it a “loan shark with massively understated defaults masquerading as a community finance provider”.

Read More »



Zuma deserves humiliation

Posted 29 January 2018

In his first major interview as leader of the ANC, Cyril Ramaphosa was at pains to emphasise that President Jacob Zuma’s early exit should not be a humiliating experience. But that is exactly what he deserves, says Mondi Makhanya, writing in City Press.

Read More »



Unsecured lending: SA sitting on another Steinhoff bubble

Posted 26 January 2018

With unsecured lending approaching R18bn, it is only a matter of time before another corporate implosion occurs, according to Glen Jordan of IMB Financial Services.

Read More »



Could Jubilee debt forgiveness be reintroduced today?

Posted 23 January 2018

As Michael Hudson and Charles Goodhart argue in this article, the Biblical concept of Jubliee debt cancellations had a stabilising effect on societies through the ages. In particular, it provided security of tenure over land for indebted farmers, which had beneficial impacts in generating future tax revenue for the rulers. Here, the authors aruge that debt cancellations could indeed be reintroduced today, albeit in a different format, to create a property-owning democracy, and to make it possible for students to attend higher level education without being crippled with debt upon graduation. Perhaps it is time to start a real discussion, backed by solid research, on the pros and cons of debt forgiveness.  

Read More »



Inside the Gupta grand heist

Posted 23 January 2018

A sensational preservation order granted this week against Gupta-owned companies has exposed a grand conspiracy by the family to steal money from the state with help from senior politicians and government officials.

Read More »



Lessons for SA from Zimbabwe

Posted 21 January 2018

South Africa has a tortured history of land ownership. Under apartheid, black South Africans were denied freehold title to land, but were allowed to reside in townships like Soweto under 30 and then 99-year leaseholds. Yet tends of thousands of residents lose their homes each year to the banks. As Lungelo Lethu Human Rights Foundation points out, repossessed properties should be returned to the local government, not the banks. Black South Africans, experiencing their first taste of property ownership, may well wonder whether this is the freedom for which they had hoped. Now ANC leader Cyril Ramaphosa now wants to take land from white farmers without compensation. Zimbabwean member of parliament Eddie Cross explains that this is a rapid route to ruin, and one need only look north of our border to understand why. Here is a lesson from Zimbabwe and how land reform should be done. 

Read More »



SAA's new CEO tolls airline's death knell

Posted 17 January 2018

If SAA were a privately-owned company, it would be shipped to the knackers' yard. It is hopelessly insolvent. The airline's new CEO Vuyani Jurana outlined to parliament's standing committee on finance, and it was not a pretty picture. Even after getting another R10bn lifeline from Treasury in March, the airline will have outstanding debt of R13,8bn and expects to post another loss of R5,6bn for 2018. Perhaps it is time to wind it up and sell the brand to a more competent airline operator. 

Read More »



NPA about to move on Guptas, sets sights on assets worth R1,6bn

Posted 15 January 2018

The Asset Forfeiture Unit, part of the National Prosecuting Authority, is preparing to make a move against the Gupta family and has its sights set on assets worth R1,6bn. This is the first time the state has taken action against President Jacob Zuma's friends, says City Press.

Read More »



Important notice for Acts Online users

Posted 12 January 2018

This site has been a free to access site since its inception in 1985. We are proud of the fact that Acts Online is the go-to site for all South Africa acts, as well as updates and amendments. Our reach continues to expand year-on-year. We also offer news on legal and political developments as they occur. Now we are asking users to contribute to its upkeep.

Read More »



Beware ANC threats to overturn property rights

Posted 10 January 2018

The ANC's support for a change in the Bill of Rights' property protection clause, allowing for expropriation without compensation, harkens back to a darker time in SA's history - the infamous Land Act of 1913 which deprived black South Africans of property rights in so-called "white" areas. The ANC is on a slippery path to outright tyranny, and the victims will be drawn from every class and race group. All it needs is a hostile government, and then no property rights will be sacrosanct, says Eustace Davie of the Free Market Foundation.

Read More »



Balance of power has shifted in the ANC as Zuma consents to state capture inquiry

Posted 10 January 2018

With the axe of a recall by the ANC hanging over his head, President Jacob Zuma has capitulated and allowed Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng to select a judge to head a judicial commission of inquiry into state capture.

Read More »



The rise of fake news under the ANC government

Posted 09 January 2018

South Africans are being fed a buffet of fake news on which to dine, from Bell Pottinger's fake "white minority capital" slurs to what looks like a fabricated 1963 article reproduced more recently in The Star eulogising the rise of a 21 year-old Jacob Zuma. Ed Herbst, writing in Biznews, explains.

Read More »



Eskom relies on 'ridiculous' lawyer's report to wipe slate clean

Posted 07 January 2018

Eskom relied on a lawyer's report to exonerate itself from wrong-doing over payment of R500-million to Trillian Capital, despite having no valid agreement with the Gupta-linked company, says Timeslive.

Read More »



Mnangagwa inherits Mugabe's trash

Posted 07 January 2018

Zim president Emmerson Mnangagwa has inherited the military machine that his predecessor, Robert Mugabe, inherited from his predecessor Ian Smith. With seven months to elections, the new Zim cabinet cannot pretend that there is any residual love for Mugabe and his bootlickers. Opposition MP Eddie Cross recalls a lunch with Mugabe many years ago, and how Pol Pot's murderous Khymer Rouge served as a model for the new Zimbabwe. That legacy will be hard to shake off.    

Read More »



Zim has a 2018 message for SA and it's not good

Posted 05 January 2018

As we launch into the New Year, there are some positive developments to consider as we ponder the plight of over-indebted consumers, the push-back against entitlement politicians, and the message trickling across the Limpopo from Zimbabwe as it confronts a brighter future. 

Read More »



After 37 years of Mugabe, Zim takes a radical turn for the better

Posted 02 January 2018

Opposition Member of Parliament for Bulawayo, Eddie Cross, recalls a frightening encounter with the newly installed Zimbabwean president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, whose new cabinet includes some excellent choices and some dubious ones. "The Crocodile", as he is known, has a reputation for taking no prisoners. But Cross remains optimistic that Mnangagwa will deliver on promises of free and fair elections, and a radical transformation of the economy. His ministers have 100 days to deliver - or else.

Read More »



Cyril leads a house divided after a deal with the devil

Posted 19 December 2017

The rand strengthened on news that Cyril Ramaphosa had been elected leader of the ANC. But with that came some cruel baggage, including individuals who have been compromised by the state capture scandal, who now join Cyril at the top table, writes Carol Paton.

Read More »



Eskom is a train smash that explains why the economy is flatlining

Posted 14 December 2017

Eskom has become a totem pole for all that is wrong with SA. It is also provides a salutary lesson in what happens when deluded socialists get their hands on the economy. As Nicholas Woode-Smith argues in this article, Eskom has been mismanaged for decades. For a time we had the cheapest power in the world, based on electricity prices that were completely unrealistic. Then the government spoke half-heartedly about inviting private competition. It was so poorly implemented it was designed to fail. The train smash that Eskom has become explains, to a larger degree than many will admit, why the economy is flatlining. 

Read More »



The views expressed herein are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Acts Online. Acts Online accepts no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or fairness of the article, nor does the information contained herein constitute advice, legal or otherwise.